Beneficios del SCD sobre la salud

The claim that individual participation in adequate amounts of regular physical activity can improve health and prevent disease is well established. The scientific evidence is based on many studies; epidemiological, clinical, and physiological. In the UK a working party of the Royal College of Physicians, convened in 1989, examined this evidence, recognised its importance, and based a series of recommendations on it (1). In 1996 a consensus development panel on physical activity and cardiovascular health convened by The National Institutes of Health recommended that all Americans should engage in regular physical activity at a level appropriate to their capacity, needs, and interest (2).

Frequent and regular aerobic exercise has been shown to help prevent or treat serious and life-threatening chronic conditions such as high blood pressure, obesity, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and some forms of cancer. It also improves mental health, helps prevent depression, and helps to promote or maintain positive self-esteem (3, 4, 5). Weight-bearing exercise has been shown to reduce the risk of osteoporosis (6, 7). Regular exercise increases the level of chemicals in the brain, notably serotonin, which improve mood (8) and so can reduce stress, anxiety and depression. It can benefit those who have been bereaved and reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. Regular exercise also helps with weight control (9).

A major priority for Public Health is to embed physical activity in the lives of many more people (10). The medical profession and especially GPs have a major role in promoting regular physical activity in the general population (11). People can engage in regular physical activity in many ways, so which is the best activity to choose?

Scottish Country Dancing has been shown to be superior to other forms of physical activity in building levels of fitness (12). A Canadian study found Scottish Country Dancing to be superior to folk and square dancing (13). It can contribute to the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, perhaps due to the complex interplay of cognitive skills needed to memorise steps and formations and co-ordinate with others, and because dance music engages the mind (14).The social component of Scottish country dancing develops a sense of community and an enjoyment factor, which encourages continued participation and, therefore, long term involvement in the physical activity (6). Also the social relationships that develop in those who take part in Scottish country dancing are linked to good health, longevity and a positive attitude (15, 16, 17).

  1. Global action plan on physical activity 2018–2030: more active people for a healthier world (available at Action plan (who.int) 9789241514187-eng.pdf (who.int))
  2. Susan Dewhurst, Norah Nelson, Paul K. Dougall, and Theodoros M. Bampouras. Scottish Country Dance Benefits to Functional Ability in Older Women. Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 2014, 22, 146-153.
  3. Keogh, J.W.L., Kilding, A., Pidgeon, P., Ashley, L., & Gillis, D. (2012). Effects of different weekly. frequencies of dance on older adults’ functional performance and physical activity patterns. European Journal of Sports and Exercise Science,1(1), 14–23.
  4. Burkhardt, J., & Brennan, C. (2012). The effects of recreational dance interventions on the health and well-being of children and young people: A systematic review. Arts & Health: An International Journal for Research, Policy and Practice, doi: 10.1080/17533015.2012.665810.
  5. Koch S, Kunz T, Lykou S, Cruz R. Effects of dance movement therapy and dance on health-related psychological outcomes: A meta-analysis The Arts in Psychotherapy, 2014, Volume 41, Issue 1, 46-64.
  6. Piotr Gronek, Stefan Balko, Joanna Gronek, Adam Zajac, Adam Maszczyk, Roman Celka, Agnieszka Doberska, Wojciech Czarny, Robert Podstawski, Cain C. T. Clark, Fang Yu: Physical Activity and Alzheimer’s Disease: A Narrative Review. Ageing and Disease. Volume 10, Number 6, December 2019
  7. Verghese J, Lipton RB, Katz MJ, Hall CB, Derby CA, Kuslansky G, Ambrose AF, Sliwinski M, Buschke H. Leisure activities and the risk of dementia in the elderly. N Engl J Med. 2003;348(25):2508–16.
  8. Bouchard C, Shephard RJ. Physical activity fitness and health: the model and key concepts. In: Bouchard C, Shephard RJ, Stephens T, editors. Physical activity fitness and health: International proceedings and consensus statement. Champaign (IL): Human Kinetics; 1994. p. 77-88.
  9. Blair SN, Brodney S. Effects of physical inactivity and obesity on morbidity and mortality: current evidence and research issues. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1999;31:S646-62.
  10. Taylor RS, Brown A, Ebrahim S, et al. Exercise-based rehabilitation for patients with coronary heart disease: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Am J Med 2004;116:682-92.
  11. Blair SN, Cheng Y, Holder JS. Is physical activity or physical fitness more important in defining health benefits? [discussion S419-20]. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2001;33:S379-99.
  12. Macera CA, Hootman JM, Sniezek JE. Major public health benefits of physical activity. Arthritis Rheum 2003;49:122-8.
  13. Macera CA, Powell KE. Population attributable risk: implications of physical activity dose. [discussion 640-1]. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2001;33:S635-9.
  14. Paul T. Williams. Physical fitness and activity as separate heart disease risk factors: a meta- analysis. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001 May ; 33(5): 754–761.
  15. Erikssen G. Physical fitness and changes in mortality: the survival of the fittest. Sports Med 2001; 31: 571-6.
  16. Erikssen G, Liestol K, Bjornholt J, et al. Changes in physical fitness and changes in mortality. Lancet 1998;352:759-62.
  17. Paffenbarger RS Jr, Hyde RT, Wing AL, et al. The association of changes in physical activity level and other lifestyle characteristics with mortality among men. N Engl J Med 1993;328:538-45.
  18. Kushi LH, Fee RM, Folsom AR, et al. Physical activity and mortality in post- menopausal women. JAMA 1997;277:1287
  19. Leon AS, Connett J, Jacobs DR Jr., et al. Leisure-time physical activity levels and risk of coronary heart disease and death. The Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial. JAMA 1987;258:2388-95.

The claim that individual participation in adequate amounts of regular physical activity can improve health and prevent disease is well established. The scientific evidence is based on many studies; epidemiological, clinical, and physiological. In the UK a working party of the Royal College of Physicians, convened in 1989, examined this evidence, recognised its importance, and based a series of recommendations on it (1). In 1996 a consensus development panel on physical activity and cardiovascular health convened by The National Institutes of Health recommended that all Americans should engage in regular physical activity at a level appropriate to their capacity, needs, and interest (2).

Frequent and regular aerobic exercise has been shown to help prevent or treat serious and life-threatening chronic conditions such as high blood pressure, obesity, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and some forms of cancer. It also improves mental health, helps prevent depression, and helps to promote or maintain positive self-esteem (3, 4, 5). Weight-bearing exercise has been shown to reduce the risk of osteoporosis (6, 7). Regular exercise increases the level of chemicals in the brain, notably serotonin, which improve mood (8) and so can reduce stress, anxiety and depression. It can benefit those who have been bereaved and reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. Regular exercise also helps with weight control (9).

A major priority for Public Health is to embed physical activity in the lives of many more people (10). The medical profession and especially GPs have a major role in promoting regular physical activity in the general population (11). People can engage in regular physical activity in many ways, so which is the best activity to choose?

Scottish Country Dancing has been shown to be superior to other forms of physical activity in building levels of fitness (12). A Canadian study found Scottish Country Dancing to be superior to folk and square dancing (13). It can contribute to the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, perhaps due to the complex interplay of cognitive skills needed to memorise steps and formations and co-ordinate with others, and because dance music engages the mind (14).The social component of Scottish country dancing develops a sense of community and an enjoyment factor, which encourages continued participation and, therefore, long term involvement in the physical activity (6). Also the social relationships that develop in those who take part in Scottish country dancing are linked to good health, longevity and a positive attitude (15, 16, 17).

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There are 159 RSCDS Branches and over 300 Affiliated Groups in more than 50 countries around the world, located on all continents (except Antarctica).

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Wherever you are in the world there is most likely Scottish Country Dancing.

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